“Ice Waves” Argyle Color Pooling Blanket – Free Crochet Pattern

Look at that! My argyle color pooling blanket is all done. It was a cold day when I photographed this blanket with my boys skating on a frozen pond, we had SO much fun! The blue colors of the blanket together with the wave pattern and the icy day inspired me to name my blanket “Ice Waves“. In this post all the information, pattern and resources you need to make your own Ice Waves argyle blanket.

argyle color pooling blanket

Resources

Materials & size

You can easily vary the length of your blanket by using more or less yarn to make a longer or shorter blanket. Here are the amounts I used to make a blanket of 115cm wide and 150cm long.

scheepjes sock yarn

Abbreviations

This pattern uses US crochet terms. If you are more familiar with UK crochet terms, please see this conversion table for the most common terms.

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • fhdc – foundation half double crochet
  • ss – slip stitch
  • st – stitch

Important note

When you make an argyle color pooling blanket using my pattern, please note that this type of project is VERY dependent on tension. Because we all have our own tension and way of working, your blanket will be similar to mine but will not be exactly the same. Your blanket may be wider or longer or the argyle pattern can cross faster or slower. This is the beauty of color pooling, we all make something unique.

argyle color pooling blanket


“Ice Waves” Argyle Color Pooling Blanket – Free Crochet Pattern

© Esther Dijkstra 2017. All rights reserved.

The pattern purposefully does not give a specific number of stitches, but rather a way of working. This is because color pooling is tension specific. I have a detailed post about (argyle) color pooling, what it is, how it works and what the requirements are for the yarn and how to join a new ball to your work. THE most important thing however is consistency, keep your tension as steady as possible to ensure an even gradient in the argyle pattern.

Argyle Center

With Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn and a 3mm hook do the following:

  1. Investigate your yarn and find the color sequence.
  2. Make a slip knot on your hook at the start of a color sequence. Choose a point that is easy to identify, something that is impossible to miss.
  3. Work a row of foundation hdc stitches using 2 full color sequences. Stop with the foundation stitches when you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2.
  4. ch2 (counts as 1dc), turn and work 1dc in each stitch until you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2.
  5. Undo 1 stitch.
  6. ch2, turn and and work 1dc in each stitch till you get to the end of the row.
  7. Repeat step 6. After about 10 rows you will start to see a pattern emerge.
  8. KEEP YOUR TENSION STEADY!
  9. Attach new yarn at the correct point
  10. Continue till your project is the size you want it to be. Then tie off and work away your yarn tails.
  11. There will be foundation stitches left unworked. Cut the stitches off at about 5cm from your work. Undo the stitches till you get to the start of your fabric. Work away the starting yarn tail you just created.

I also have a video showing how to work my method for argyle color pooling. I hope this video can help to take away any final doubts or questions you may have.

Border

When your blanket is large enough work a border around the blanket as a finishing touch. There are 3 border rounds on the long side of the blanket and 6 on the short side.

  1. Attach yarn to the top of the blanket where you finished the argyle pattern, * ch2 (counts as 1dc), and work 1dc in every stitch along the short side of the blanket *. Turn and repeat from * two more times to work 3 rows of dc in total.
  2. Repeat step 1 at the other side of the blanket. This will mean that you will work in the bottom of the fhdc stitches.
  3. Work ss along the two other edges of the blanket in preparation of the final border rounds. Work 5 ss for every 3dc’s. The process is not an exact science, see this video for more details.
  4. Attach yarn in any stitch, ch2 (counts as 1dc), and work 1dc in each stitch. When you get to a corner, work 3dc in the corner stitch. Mark the 2nd of the 3 corner stitches. Continue all the way round and close with a ss on the first st. DO NOT turn your work.
  5. ch2, (counts as 1dc), and * work 1dc in each stitch till the marked stitch, 5dc in the marked stitch, mark 3rd of these 5dc stitches. * Repeat from * on the other 3 edges. Close with a ss on first st.
  6. Repeat step 5
  7. Work away all yarn tails.
  8. You can wash your blanket in the washing machine if you like, the Matterhorn yarn is a sock yarn and easy to maintain.

When you have added the border, the blanket will look something like this.

argyle blanket


The photo’s in this post were taken at a local water mill close to my home. It was a cold day in January and I was SO COLD, but it was just magic with my boys.

The ice was thick enough to skate and walk on. I am soooo wobbly on the ice because I don’t trust my balance. My boys held my hand to walk over the ice to take this photo.

color pooling blanket

It was a magic time with my family. Feel free to share your magic crochet moments on my Facebook page or tag me in one of your post on Instagram. You can also use #itsallinanutshell to help me find it.

With love,

Esther

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This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.

© COPYRIGHT IT’S ALL IN A NUTSHELL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS PATTERN IS AVAILABLE FOR UNLIMITED PERSONAL USE. YOU MAY PRINT A COPY OF THE PATTERN OR KEEP A DIGITAL COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. DO NOT REPRODUCE OR SELL MY PATTERNS (EITHER DIGITALLY OR IN PRINT). DO NOT POST MY PATTERNS ONLINE, EITHER AS A COMPLETE DOCUMENT OR IN PART. PLEASE REFER BACK TO THIS PATTERN BY LINKING TO IT FROM YOUR BLOG OR WEBSITE. YOU MAY SELL ITEMS THAT YOU MAKE WITH MY PATTERN AS LONG AS YOU CREDIT ME AS THE DESIGNER. TO SHOP OWNERS AND YARN SELLERS : IT IS NOT ALLOWED TO MAKE KITS WITHOUT MY PERMISSION. PLEASE DO NOT PRINT COPIES TO DISTRIBUTE WITH YARN SALES AS THIS IS AN INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT. THE COPYRIGHT OF THIS FREE CROCHET PATTERN IS PROTECTED BY SCHEEPJES.COM.

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Argyle Color Pooling Blanket WIP

I have been working steadily on my argyle color pooling blanket over the past few months and I would like to show you where I am at the moment. Remember were I was last time? I had only done a few rows and used just over 1 ball of Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn

I have come quite a bit further since that last photo. At this point I have worked just over 5 balls of Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn, a sock yarn that I am using with a 3mm hook. I am also going to add a border using a solid color of the Scheepjes Invicta Extra range.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn-wip-2

After about 4 balls the argyle pattern started to become very visible. Because of the long color change in the yarn, it is a subtle pattern and not as busy as you might have seen with other argyle patterns.

I have come to the conclusion that I am not a robot; I can’t keep my tension 100% constant all the time. This means that my argyle pattern is a little wobbly at times and sometimes shifts over more and sometimes less. As such a slight variation in tension is not a problem, but it accumulates over many stitches meaning that with the long color change of the yarn I have noticed that sometimes my shift is 1 stitch and sometimes 5 stitches. This variation in the argyle shift is what causes my wobbly pattern. Personally I don’t think it’s a problem because it makes my blanket all the more personal and unique. No person on the planet will be able to match my pattern EXACTLY. Isn’t that cool, you can make something completely unique simply by being yourself!

argyle color pooling blanket


Color pooling, or yarn pooling, is popular at the moment and I thought to myself “how hard can it be?” Famous last words right? No, actually it’s not as hard as it looks. I have a detailed description taking you every step of the way. If you prefer, I also have a video showing you how to do argyle color pooling should you want to try your hand at it.


argyle color pooling blanket

Are you doing color pooling? Feel free to share your photo’s on my Facebook page or tag me in your post on Instagram. You can also use #itsallinanutshell to help me find it.

With love,

Esther

logo it's all in a nutshell

Follow me on

Facebook, Pinterest, You-Tube, Google+, RavelryBloglovin’, Instagram

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.

© COPYRIGHT IT’S ALL IN A NUTSHELL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.