“Ice Waves” Argyle Color Pooling Blanket – Free Crochet Pattern

Look at that! My argyle color pooling blanket is all done. It was a cold day when I photographed this blanket with my boys skating on a frozen pond, we had SO much fun! The blue colors of the blanket together with the wave pattern and the icy day inspired me to name my blanket “Ice Waves“. In this post all the information, pattern and resources you need to make your own Ice Waves argyle blanket.

argyle color pooling blanket

Resources

Materials & size

You can easily vary the length of your blanket by using more or less yarn to make a longer or shorter blanket. Here are the amounts I used to make a blanket of 115cm wide and 150cm long.

scheepjes sock yarn

Abbreviations

This pattern uses US crochet terms. If you are more familiar with UK crochet terms, please see this conversion table for the most common terms.

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • fhdc – foundation half double crochet
  • ss – slip stitch
  • st – stitch

Important note

When you make an argyle color pooling blanket using my pattern, please note that this type of project is VERY dependent on tension. Because we all have our own tension and way of working, your blanket will be similar to mine but will not be exactly the same. Your blanket may be wider or longer or the argyle pattern can cross faster or slower. This is the beauty of color pooling, we all make something unique.

argyle color pooling blanket


“Ice Waves” Argyle Color Pooling Blanket – Free Crochet Pattern

© Esther Dijkstra 2017. All rights reserved.

The pattern purposefully does not give a specific number of stitches, but rather a way of working. This is because color pooling is tension specific. I have a detailed post about (argyle) color pooling, what it is, how it works and what the requirements are for the yarn and how to join a new ball to your work. THE most important thing however is consistency, keep your tension as steady as possible to ensure an even gradient in the argyle pattern.

Argyle Center

With Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn and a 3mm hook do the following:

  1. Investigate your yarn and find the color sequence.
  2. Make a slip knot on your hook at the start of a color sequence. Choose a point that is easy to identify, something that is impossible to miss.
  3. Work a row of foundation hdc stitches using 2 full color sequences. Stop with the foundation stitches when you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2.
  4. ch2 (counts as 1dc), turn and work 1dc in each stitch until you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2.
  5. Undo 1 stitch.
  6. ch2, turn and and work 1dc in each stitch till you get to the end of the row.
  7. Repeat step 6. After about 10 rows you will start to see a pattern emerge.
  8. KEEP YOUR TENSION STEADY!
  9. Attach new yarn at the correct point
  10. Continue till your project is the size you want it to be. Then tie off and work away your yarn tails.
  11. There will be foundation stitches left unworked. Cut the stitches off at about 5cm from your work. Undo the stitches till you get to the start of your fabric. Work away the starting yarn tail you just created.

I also have a video showing how to work my method for argyle color pooling. I hope this video can help to take away any final doubts or questions you may have.

Border

When your blanket is large enough work a border around the blanket as a finishing touch. There are 3 border rounds on the long side of the blanket and 6 on the short side.

  1. Attach yarn to the top of the blanket where you finished the argyle pattern, * ch2 (counts as 1dc), and work 1dc in every stitch along the short side of the blanket *. Turn and repeat from * two more times to work 3 rows of dc in total.
  2. Repeat step 1 at the other side of the blanket. This will mean that you will work in the bottom of the fhdc stitches.
  3. Work ss along the two other edges of the blanket in preparation of the final border rounds. Work 5 ss for every 3dc’s. The process is not an exact science, see this video for more details.
  4. Attach yarn in any stitch, ch2 (counts as 1dc), and work 1dc in each stitch. When you get to a corner, work 3dc in the corner stitch. Mark the 2nd of the 3 corner stitches. Continue all the way round and close with a ss on the first st. DO NOT turn your work.
  5. ch2, (counts as 1dc), and * work 1dc in each stitch till the marked stitch, 5dc in the marked stitch, mark 3rd of these 5dc stitches. * Repeat from * on the other 3 edges. Close with a ss on first st.
  6. Repeat step 5
  7. Work away all yarn tails.
  8. You can wash your blanket in the washing machine if you like, the Matterhorn yarn is a sock yarn and easy to maintain.

When you have added the border, the blanket will look something like this.

argyle blanket


The photo’s in this post were taken at a local water mill close to my home. It was a cold day in January and I was SO COLD, but it was just magic with my boys.

The ice was thick enough to skate and walk on. I am soooo wobbly on the ice because I don’t trust my balance. My boys held my hand to walk over the ice to take this photo.

color pooling blanket

It was a magic time with my family. Feel free to share your magic crochet moments on my Facebook page or tag me in one of your post on Instagram. You can also use #itsallinanutshell to help me find it.

With love,

Esther

logo it's all in a nutshell

Follow me on

Facebook, Pinterest, You-Tube, Google+, RavelryBloglovin’, Instagram

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.

© COPYRIGHT IT’S ALL IN A NUTSHELL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS PATTERN IS AVAILABLE FOR UNLIMITED PERSONAL USE. YOU MAY PRINT A COPY OF THE PATTERN OR KEEP A DIGITAL COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. DO NOT REPRODUCE OR SELL MY PATTERNS (EITHER DIGITALLY OR IN PRINT). DO NOT POST MY PATTERNS ONLINE, EITHER AS A COMPLETE DOCUMENT OR IN PART. PLEASE REFER BACK TO THIS PATTERN BY LINKING TO IT FROM YOUR BLOG OR WEBSITE. YOU MAY SELL ITEMS THAT YOU MAKE WITH MY PATTERN AS LONG AS YOU CREDIT ME AS THE DESIGNER. TO SHOP OWNERS AND YARN SELLERS : IT IS NOT ALLOWED TO MAKE KITS WITHOUT MY PERMISSION. PLEASE DO NOT PRINT COPIES TO DISTRIBUTE WITH YARN SALES AS THIS IS AN INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT. THE COPYRIGHT OF THIS FREE CROCHET PATTERN IS PROTECTED BY SCHEEPJES.COM.

Advertisements

Argyle Color Pooling Blanket WIP

I have been working steadily on my argyle color pooling blanket over the past few months and I would like to show you where I am at the moment. Remember were I was last time? I had only done a few rows and used just over 1 ball of Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn

I have come quite a bit further since that last photo. At this point I have worked just over 5 balls of Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn, a sock yarn that I am using with a 3mm hook. I am also going to add a border using a solid color of the Scheepjes Invicta Extra range.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn-wip-2

After about 4 balls the argyle pattern started to become very visible. Because of the long color change in the yarn, it is a subtle pattern and not as busy as you might have seen with other argyle patterns.

I have come to the conclusion that I am not a robot; I can’t keep my tension 100% constant all the time. This means that my argyle pattern is a little wobbly at times and sometimes shifts over more and sometimes less. As such a slight variation in tension is not a problem, but it accumulates over many stitches meaning that with the long color change of the yarn I have noticed that sometimes my shift is 1 stitch and sometimes 5 stitches. This variation in the argyle shift is what causes my wobbly pattern. Personally I don’t think it’s a problem because it makes my blanket all the more personal and unique. No person on the planet will be able to match my pattern EXACTLY. Isn’t that cool, you can make something completely unique simply by being yourself!

argyle color pooling blanket


Color pooling, or yarn pooling, is popular at the moment and I thought to myself “how hard can it be?” Famous last words right? No, actually it’s not as hard as it looks. I have a detailed description taking you every step of the way. If you prefer, I also have a video showing you how to do argyle color pooling should you want to try your hand at it.


argyle color pooling blanket

Are you doing color pooling? Feel free to share your photo’s on my Facebook page or tag me in your post on Instagram. You can also use #itsallinanutshell to help me find it.

With love,

Esther

logo it's all in a nutshell

Follow me on

Facebook, Pinterest, You-Tube, Google+, RavelryBloglovin’, Instagram

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.

© COPYRIGHT IT’S ALL IN A NUTSHELL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Planned Color Pooling with long color changing variegated yarn

Yarn pooling is an interesting phenomenon which can be both a wonderful blessing and a massive bother, depending on what you are doing. With this post I am aiming to lift the fog around color pooling a bit.

Op verzoek heb ik deze uitleg ook in het Nederlands beschikbaar. 

Huh? Color pooling? What’s color pooling?

If you have never worked with color changing yarn before you might not know what color pooling is. Color pooling occurs in a fabric worked with a color changing yarn when the same colors from different parts of the yarn line up over several rows or rounds of the pattern. Usually this is an unwanted phenomenon because most people use a color changing yarn to get random colors. But you can use this phenomenon to create some pretty awesome effects too.

argyle-socks-1178646_1920

How planned color pooling works

Color pooling is based on the principle that when a color changing yarn is manufactured it is done with a steady rhythm in the colorway. For example, the yarn will be repeating the colors redgreygreenblueorange. So when the strand comes to the end of the orange bit, it starts again with red and the sequence is again redgreygreenblueorange. The color cycle keeps on repeating and it is this repetition which we can use to our advantage.

To get planned color pooling to work you need to work in sync with the color rhythm of the yarn. This implies per definition that working in the color rhythm means that your rhythm will be unique because each one of us has a unique tension and way of working. But, before we get into dealing with personal differences, lets first look at how to apply color pooling.

Take a look at the image below. Each square represents a stitch, this can be any stitch, a single crochet, a double crochet, or a group of stitches, doesn’t matter. But what is important is that the stitch is the same for each square. Now let us assume that we are using a color changing yarn that consists of 5 colors of an even length in the color sequence redgreygreenblueorange and let us assume that it takes 5 stitches to work each color. This means that if we start the first stitch of color 1 (stitch A1) after working 25 stitches we will be at the end of the sequence (stitch Y1).

For row 2 we turn our work and repeat row 1. This means that row 2 will  be exactly the same as row 1, but in reverse order. To make it more easy to follow I have added arrows to the graph to indicate the working direction.

Row 3 is again a repetition of row 1 and 2, but now a bit of magic starts to happen in the colors. As you see in the graph, the colors for row 3 line up EXACTLY with the colors from row 1. It is this intentional alignment that we call planned color pooling. When you keep on working more rows according to the graph you will see that for every second row the colors align and this gives stripes over your work and you have created a planned color pooled fabric.

Color Pooling in yarn

How argyle color pooling works

Now that you know how planned color pooling works, you can take it to the next level; argyle color pooling. In essence argyle color pooling is the same process, but now you are both aligning AND moving the color sequences to get the characteristic diamond shapes associated with argyle patterns. Please, don’t stress. It’s not as hard as it sounds. Let me take you through it step-by-step.

Assume we are using the same yarn as in the example above, so a color changing yarn with the sequence redgreygreenblueorange and we again work a row of stitches starting with the red and the last stitch is an orange stitch.

BEFORE continuing with row 2, remove stitch Y1 and then continue with row 2. This means that the new pattern will be one stitch shorter than the previous example, and it is the one stitch that causes the colorway to shift over. You will notice in the graph below that there are no stitches in column Y; this is the shift I am talking about.

Stitch Y1 is now worked at position X2, which means that all the consecutive stitches in row 2 have to move one position also. By the time you get to the end of row 2 and move to row 3, the shift becomes 2 stitches. This steady shift of 2 stitches per two rows causes the colors to move. In the middle of the fabric the colors will cross over and this can look a bit muddled, but the argyle diamond will be present moving outward and inward repetitively. In this pattern the blue diamond is the most pronounced.

Argyle color pooling

Requirements for the yarn

In theory color pooling and argyle color pooling should work for any yarn that has a color change, but there are a few things that I have found work, and a few that don’t. I have tried 7 different yarns and investigated different methods looking for what does and does not work. My conclusions:

  1. The yarn must have clear and distinct color changes. This means that yarns that show a gradual color change will not work. You need that sudden change from one color to the next to be able to identify when you have completed a color sequence.
  2. There must be a steady rhythm to the color sequence. The amount of colors in the sequence is not important, it can be 3 colors or 10 colors, but they must be organised in the same repetitive way. So for example Color A, Color B, Color C repeated in a sequence will mean the yarn is A-B-C–A-B-C–A-B-C etc.
  3. I have found that the length of each color in the color sequence is not critical, but color pooling is easier if the color segments are shorter rather than longer. The longer a color segment is, the more important consistent tension becomes to obtain the planned color pooling effect. Color pooling is most easy if the color segments in a colorway are about 10 to 20cm each, but I have managed to get color pooling to work with color segments up to 2 meter. Tension is key here.
  4. If your total color sequence is over 20 meter, don’t try color pooling. Trust me on this.

Here you see an example of the color sequence in a variegated yarn. This is Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn showing the color rhythm. As you can see some parts of the color sequence are long and others are short. This is not an issue at all. It will simply means that some of your stripes will be thicker than others.

identify-colors-for-color-pooling

Requirements for your work

By far the most important requirement is consistency. Your tension needs to be as consistent as possible. The longer the color sequence, the more important tension becomes and the more prominent changes in tension are. In the worst case scenario your tension changes to such a degree that your stripes don’t shift evenly and you get jerking. This is what happened to me in my first attempt at color pooling. See how the stripes suddenly jump in the last 3 rows? I have indicated the most obvious point with arrows, but if you look more closely you will see that there are more places where the color pooling jumps. Sometimes this is due to my tension not being steady enough, but it can also be due to slight variations in the length of the color sequences in the yarn. The slight jump is almost inevitable and the longer the color sequences, the more pronounced a slight change in tension or color length will be. Personally I don’t mind, it gives my work a natural and playful look.

jump-in-crochet-color-pooling

Another important requirement is that you ignore specific stitch counts given to you by well meaning others. The number of stitches you make per color sequence will depend on the yarn you use, the lot number of that yarn, the stitch you are making, the hook size you are using, your personal tension and maybe even your mood that day. So ignore all stitch advises such as start with 10dc, ch20, or whatever. The amount of stitches you need will be unique to you. The best thing you can do is adapt on the fly. I will explain this in a moment.

My method for Color Pooling

I have devised my own method for color pooling based on what I have noticed works for me. If this doesn’t work for you, no hard feelings. Adapt and change as you need it.

  1. Investigate your yarn and find the color sequence.
  2. Make a slip knot on your hook at the start of a color sequence. Choose a point that is easy to identify, e.g. the sudden change from pink to blue. Something that is impossible to miss.
  3. Work a row of foundation hdc stitches using 2 full color sequences. This row is not part of your pattern, consider it row 0 in the argyle graph above. Stop with the foundation stitches when you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2.
  4. Turn and work your pattern row until you have the same color yarn on your hook as you started with in step 2. This is equivalent to row 1 in the argyle graph above.
  5. Undo 1 stitch. If you are working a group of stitches which you are repeating, undo one group of stitches.
  6. Turn and work your pattern till you get to the end of the row. This is row 2 in the argyle graph above.
  7. Turn and repeat working each row. After about 10 rows you will start to see a pattern emerge.
  8. KEEP YOUR TENSION STEADY!
  9. Attach new yarn at the correct point
  10. Continue till your project is the size you want it to be. Then tie off and work away your yarn tail.
  11. There will be foundation stitches left unworked. Cut the stitches off at about 10cm from your work. Undo the stitches till you get to the start of your fabric. Work away the starting yarn tail you just created.

color-pooling-steps

Video

I have taken the liberty of also making a video showing how to work my method for color pooling. I have included this video in my series on Crochet Fundamentals. I hope this video can help to take away any final doubts or questions you may have.

Attach new yarn

Obviously, the chance that you will use more than one ball to make a project is rather high, so how to you cope with that? First of all, don’t stress and don’t panic. Follow these steps to get your yarn connection as smooth as possible

  1. Find the end point of the color sequence on the old ball. Cut your yarn about 20cm after the end of the color sequence.
  2. Find the starting point of the color sequence on the new ball. Cut your yarn about 20cm before the start of the color sequence.
  3. Knot the two yarns together at the point where the old ball’s color sequence ends and the new balls sequence starts. If you are really good at getting the joining position right you could use a Russian join, but if you are unsure, just knot the two together.
  4. Crochet over the knot and work a few stitches.
  5. Unpick the knot you just made and work away your yarn tails.

adding-new-ball-in-color-pooling

BIG NOTE: You must attach a new color sequence if you find a knot in your ball. I promise you that the pattern you are working will jerk if you just continue crocheting. Cut out the knot and attach the color sequence at the correct point.

My challenge: A Color Pooled Lapghan

I have set myself the challenge to make a lapghan using the color pooling method with Scheepjes Matterhorn. The Matterhorn has a relatively long color sequence, this means that my tension has to be steady. I have worked a set of foundation hdc, then a row of dc, pulled out 1 stitch, and then I continue to work dc’s for many more rows. I have made a small start and I am just loving the pattern that is emerging. This is super easy crochet; perfect for watching TV. I will keep you posted about my progress.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn

With love,

Esther

logo it's all in a nutshell

Follow me on

Facebook, Pinterest, You-Tube, Google+, RavelryBloglovin’, Instagram

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.

Planned Color Pooling met Lang Kleurverloop Garen

Planned Color Pooling is een opmerkelijk fenomeen dat zich kan voordoen als je met kleurverloop garen werkt. Het kan iets heel leuks zijn maar het kan ook super irritant zijn, ligt er aan hoe je ernaar kijkt en waar je mee bezig bent. 

If you don’t speak Dutch, I also have this post available in English.

Huh? Color Pooling? Wat is dat?

Indien je nog niet eerder met kleurverloop garen hebt gewerkt weet je misschien niet wat Color Pooling is. Color Pooling ontstaat wanneer dezelfde kleur uitlijnt over meerdere rijen of toeren van je werk. Meestal is dit iets wat je niet wilt; de meeste mensen gebruiken kleurverloop garen voor de willekeurige kleureffecten die je ermee creëert. Je kunt er echter voor kiezen om het uitlijnen van kleuren voor jou te laten werken en mooie patronen te creëren.

argyle-socks-1178646_1920

Hoe werkt Planned Color Pooling?

Planned Color Pooling is gebaseerd op het principe dat wanneer garen gemaakt wordt, het met een bepaald ritme in de kleurveranderingen wordt gemaakt. Bijvoorbeeld, het garen kan uit de herhalende kleuren rood – grijs – groenblauw – oranje bestaan. Dit betekent dat wanneer de streng aan het einde oranje, de volgende kleur weer rood is en dan begint de volgorde kleurcyclus rood – grijs – groenblauw – oranje. De kleurcyclus zal zichzelf blijven herhalen en het is deze voorspelbare herhaling die we gaan gebruiken om iets moois te maken.

Om mooie effecten met Planned Color Pooling te krijgen moet je gesynchroniseerd met het kleurverloop van het garen werken. Dit betekent per definitie dat het ritme waarin je werkt uniek zal zijn voor jou omdat we allemaal een eigen draadspanning en manier van werken hebben. Voordat we in alle details duiken over persoonlijke verschillen laten we eerst kijken hoe Planned Color Pooling eigenlijk werkt.

Kijk even rustig naar het schema hieronder. Ieder blokje stelt een steek voor. Dit kan een willekeurige steek zijn, zoals een vaste of een stokje, maar het kan ook een groepje steken zijn. Maakt niet uit; wat belangrijk is, is dat iedere steek hetzelfde is voor ieder blokje. Laten we nu aannemen dat we met een kleurverloop garen werken dat uit 5 kleuren van gelijke lengte bestaat met de kleurcyclus rood – grijs – groenblauw – oranje en laten we ook nog eens aannemen dat we 5 steken nodig hebben om ieder kleursegment te haken. Dit betekent dat als we de eerste steek haken aan het begin van kleur 1 (steek A1), we na 25 steken de hele kleurcyclus hebben gehaakt (steek Y1).

Voor rij 2 keren we ons werk en herhalen we rij 1. Dit betekent dat rij 2 precies hetzelfde zal zijn als rij 1, maar dan in omgekeerde volgorde. Om beter te kunnen volgen wat ik bedoel heb ik pijlen op het schema gezet om de werkrichting aan te geven.

Rij 3 is een herhaling van rij 1 en 2, maar nu gebeurt er iets bijna magisch. Zoals je kunt zien in het schema lijnen de kleuren van rij 3 PRECIES op met de kleuren van rij 1. Het is deze opzettelijke uitlijning van kleuren die we Planned Color Pooling noemen. Wanneer je meerdere rijen hebt gehaakt zie je dat de kleuren van ieder tweede rij oplijnen en zo strepen maken in je werk. Zie zo, een gehaakt stofje met Planned Color Pooling effect is geboren.

Color Pooling in yarn

Hoe werkt Argyle Planned Color Pooling?

Nu dat je weet hoe Planned Color Pooling werkt, kun je een stapje verder gaan; Argyle Planned Color Pooling. Eigenlijk is het hetzelfde proces als Planned Color Pooling, maar nu gaan we de kleuren zowel uitlijnen als laten bewegen in het karakteristieke ruitpatroon dat zo kenmerkend is voor argyle patronen. Vooral niet stressen, het is niet zo erg als het eruit ziet. Ik neem je stap-voor-stap mee.

Laten we weer uitgaan van hetzelfde garenvoorbeeld als hierboven, een garen met kleurverloop rood – grijs – groenblauw – oranje en we werken weer een rij steken beginnend bij rood en de laatste steek is oranje.

VOORDAT we verder gaan met rij 2 halen we 1 steekje uit, dit is steek Y1 en dan gaan we verder met rij 2. Omdat we deze ene steek hebben weggehaald wordt ons lapje één steek korter en schuift het kleurpatroon een klein beetje op. 

Steek Y1 wordt nu gewerkt op positie X2 en de steek die op positie X2 moest komen moet ook een steekje opschuiven naar positie W2 enzovoort. Aangekomen bij het einde van rij 2 gaat de steek die op positie B2 moest komen naar A3 en de steek die op A2 moest komen naar B3. Op deze manier hebben we een verschuiving van 2 steken. Deze verschuiving van 2 steken per 2 rijen is de reden waarom de kleuren gaan bewegen. In het midden van het lapje kruisen de kleuren elkaar en kan het een beetje rommelig overkomen, maar de ruit zal vooral aan de buitenkant goed zichtbaar zijn. In dit voorbeeld is de blauwe ruit het meest zichtbaar.

Argyle color pooling

Vereisten voor het garen

In theorie zou Planned Color Pooling met een willekeurig kleurverloop garen moeten werken, maar ik heb gemerkt dat er sommige soorten garen zijn die werken en een aantal andere die niet werken. Ik heb 7 verschillende kleurverloop garens onderzocht en ik ben tot de volgende conclusies gekomen:

  1. Het garen moet duidelijke kleurovergangen hebben. Dit betekent dat garen dat geleidelijk van een kleur naar een ander gaat niet geschikt is. Je hebt de plotselinge overgang nodig om te kunnen bepalen wanneer je bij een nieuwe kleurcyclus bent aangekomen.
  2. Er moet een vast ritme in de kleurcyclus zijn. Het aantal kleuren dat er in één kleurcyclus is is niet belangrijk, het kan 3 kleuren zijn of 10 kleuren, maakt niet uit. Wat belangrijk is, is dat ze telkens op dezelfde manier zijn georganiseerd. Bijvoorbeeld, garen met Kleur A, Kleur B en Kleur C moet een vast ritme hebben A-B-C–A-B-C–A-B-C etc.
  3. Ik ben tot de conclusie gekomen dat de lengte van ieder kleursegment niet belangrijk is, maar Planned Color Pooling is makkelijker als de kleursegmenten wat korter zijn. Hoe langer een kleursegment is, hoe belangrijker het wordt om een constante draadspanning te hebben om het juiste effect te krijgen. Planned Pooling is het makkelijkst als ieder kleursegment 10 tot 20cm lang is, maar ik heb het al laten werken met kleursegmenten tot 2m. Draadspanning is het toverwoord hier.
  4. Indien één kleurcyclus meer dan 20 meter is, kun je Planned Color Pooling beter niet proberen. Vertrouw me maar.

Hier zie je een voorbeeld van de kleurcyclus van het kleurverloop garen Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn. Zoals je kunt zien zijn sommige stukken van de cyclus langer dan andere; dit geeft niets. Het betekent gewoon dat sommige van je strepen breder zullen zijn dan andere.

identify-colors-for-color-pooling

Vereisten voor je werk

Wat veruit de belangrijkste vereiste is, is gelijkmatigheid. Je draadspanning moet zo constant zijn als mogelijk. Hoe langer de kleurcyclus, hoe belangrijker een gelijkmatige draadspanning is, want variaties in draadspanning leiden tot ongewenste variaties in de uitlijning. In het ergste geval verandert je spanning dusdanig dat grote sprongen in de strepen te zien zijn.

Dit is wat er bij mijn eerste poging tot Planned Pooling gebeurde. Zie je hoe de strepen opeens een grotere stap maken in de laatste 3 rijen? De meest duidelijke punten heb ik met de pijlen aangegeven, maar er zijn meer plekken waar je een sprong in de strepen kunt zien.

Ik denk dat een verandering in mijn draadspanning verantwoordelijk is voor de sprongetjes, maar het kan ook zijn dat er variaties zijn in de lengte van de kleursegmenten tussen de verschillende kleurcycli. Het is bijna niet te voorkomen dat bij lange kleurverloop garens er een kleine variatie is tussen de lengtes van de verschillende kleursegmenten. Persoonlijk vind ik het niet erg als er kleine sprongetjes zijn. Ik vind het eigenlijk nogal leuk en speels.

jump-in-crochet-color-pooling

Nog iets dat heel belangrijk is, is om alle goedbedoelde adviezen over hoeveel steken je nodig hebt te negeren. De hoeveelheid steken die je nodig hebt per kleurcyclus hangt namelijk af van welk garen je gebruikt, welk lotnummer je garen heeft, de steek die je gebruikt, de maat haaknaald die je gebruikt, je persoonlijke draadspanning en misschien ook wel je humeur van de dag. Dus, negeer alle adviezen zoals “werk 10 stokjes” of “haak 20 lossen” of iets dergelijks. De hoeveelheid steken die je nodig hebt is persoonsafhankelijk. Het beste dat je kunt doen is aanpassen terwijl je bezig bent. Ik leg zo uit wat ik daarmee bedoel.

Mijn manier van werken voor Argyle Planned Color Pooling

Ik heb mijn eigen manier ontworpen om Planned Pooling voor elkaar te krijgen..

  1. Kijk goed naar je garen en ontdek de kleurcyclus.
  2. Maak een opzetlus op je haaknaald bij de startpunt van een kleurcyclus. Kies een punt dat makkelijk te herkennen is, bijvoorbeeld een duidelijke overgang van roze naar blauw. Iets dat niet te missen is.
  3. Werk één rij opzet halfstokjes voor 2 volle kleurcycli. Deze opzetrij is niet deel van je patroon. Het is eigenlijk rij 0 in het schema hierboven. Stop met de opzetsteken als je een lus op je haaknaald hebt in dezelfde kleur als waarmee je begonnen bent in stap 2.
  4. Keer je werk en werk nu één kleurcyclus in het patroon dat je wilt werken. Stop dus als je weer dezelfde kleur lus op je haaknaald hebt als in stap 2. Dit is rij 1 van het schema hierboven.
  5. Haal 1 steek uit. Als je een groepje steken hebt dat je telkens herhaalt, haal dan 1 groepje uit.
  6. Keer je werk en herhaal je patroon tot eind van de rij. Dit is rij 2 in het Argyle schema hierboven.
  7. Keer je werk en herhaal je patroon voor zoveel rijen als je wilt. Na ongeveer 10 rijen zal het begin van je kleurpatroon zichtbaar zijn.
  8. HOUD JE DRAADSPANNING CONSTANT!
  9. Hecht een nieuwe bol aan bij het juiste punt in de kleurcyclus.
  10. Ga door tot je werk zo groot is als je het wilt hebben. Hecht af en werk je draad weg.
  11. Er zullen verschillende opzetsteken zijn die je niet hebt gebruikt. Knip de opzetsteken op ongeveer 10cm van je werk af. Maak de overgebleven opzetsteken los en werk de draad die zich vormt weg.

color-pooling-steps

Video

Ik heb alles dat ik tot nu toe heb uitgelegd ook in een video gezet. Deze video is echter in het Engels.

Nieuwe draad aanhechten

De kans is groot dat je meer dan één bol garen nodig zal hebben om een project te maken, maar hoe hecht je een nieuwe bol aan? Geen paniek. Volg deze stappen en het komt vast goed.

  1. Vind het eindpunt van een kleurcyclus van je oude bol garen. Knip je draad door 20cm na het eind van de kleurcyclus.
  2. Vind het beginpunt van de kleurcyclus van je nieuwe bol garen. Knip de draad door 20cm voor het begin van de kleurcyclus.
  3. Knoop de twee draden samen waar de kleurcyclus van de ene bol eindigt en de nieuwe begint.
  4. Haak nu gewoon door en haak over de knoop heen.
  5. Wanneer je een aantal rijen hebt gehaakt, maak de knoop los en werk de draden weg.

adding-new-ball-in-color-pooling

LET OP: Je moet een nieuwe kleurcyclus aanhechten als je een knoop in je garen tegenkomt.  Ik het kan je op een briefje geven dat er rare sprongen in je Planned Pooling zal zijn als je gewoon doorwerkt. Knip de knoop eruit en hecht op de juiste plek een nieuwe kleurcyclus aan.

Mijn uitdaging: een Planned Color Pooled deken

Ik ben de uitdaging aangegaan om een deken te maken waarbij ik Planned Color Pooling gebruik met Scheepjes Invicta Matterhorn. Matterhorn heeft een relatief lange kleurcyclus wat betekend dat mijn draadspanning heel gelijkmatig moet zijn. In het kort heb ik een rij opzet halfstokjes gehaakt, daarna een rij stokjes, 1 steek uitgehaald, en daarna doorgegaan met rijen stokjes. Ik heb een kleine start gemaakt en ik ben echt helemaal weg van het patroon dat onder mijn handen aan het groeien is. Dit is trouwens echt een geweldig werkje voor als je TV kijkt. Je hoeft niet na te denken, gewoon lekker doorhaken.

yarn-pooling-with-matterhorn-sock-yarn

Veel liefs,

Esther

logo it's all in a nutshell

Follow me on

Facebook, Pinterest, You-Tube, Google+, RavelryBloglovin’, Instagram

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and copyright policy. All opinions are my own and I only link to products I use or would use. Thank you for using the links on my blog and supporting my work.