How to speak crochet slang

“I had a WIP that I was considering frogging before it turned into a UFO, but I picked it up again and now it is HOTH.”

Are you looking at that and thinking “Huh?? What is she talking about?” You see, there is more than just stitch terms and definitions when it comes to crochet. There is a whole set of terms that people use to describe their work, what they are doing and what the end result looks like. In this episode of my Crochet Fundamentals series I am listing as many of those strange terms as I could find.

how to speak crochet slang

There are a lot of terms that I know because I use them myself, but then there are always less common terms that you sometimes see floating around. Here is a list of things that I could find online and their explanations.

  1. Ami – short for Amigurumi, the Japanese art of making crochet animals and toys
  2. Bistichtual – this is someone who both knits and crochets
  3. C2CCorner-to-Corner Crochet
  4. CAL – Crochet Along, a project in which a new part of the pattern is released every week or fortnight. A crochet along is a great way to work on the same project with people from all over the world.
  5. CnC – Critter and Crochet photo, this a photo of your pet with your crochet work, usually your cat or dog that is preventing you from getting to your crochet because they are all over it.
  6. De-stashing (also know as Un-stashing) – when you give away or sell some of your yarn stash, usually to make room for more yarn that you really want.
  7. FO – Finished object
  8. FOTH – Fresh off the Hook
  9. Freeform (also called freestyle or freehand) – crochet worked without a pattern, just taking it one stitch at a time and seeing where it goes.
  10. Frog or Frogging – ripping out your work. The word comes from the sound that a frog makes, ‘ribbit’ which sounds like ‘rip it’.
  11. FS – For Sale, when posing an item such as yarn or crochet project in a social group which is available for sale.
  12. Hooker – A proud crocheter; very true for me, for you too?
  13. HOTH – Hot off the hook
  14. HSPY – Have not started project yet
  15. ISO – In search of, usually yarn or a pattern
  16. JOTH – Just off the hook
  17. LYS – Local or little yarn store, a very dangerous place!
  18. MAM – Mile a Minute afghan, a project that works up really fast.
  19. MGBTC – Must get back to crocheting
  20. NCR – Not Crochet Related, often used in crochet social groups when posting something that is not related to crochet.
  21. OCD – Obsessive crocheting disorder
  22. PABLE – Patterns accumulated beyond life expectancy
  23. PHD – projects half done
  24. PIGS – projects in grocery bags, this is not a good sign actually….
  25. PTP – Permission to Post, especially applicable to social groups that have strict rules about what may and may not be posted.
  26. SABLE – stash accumulated beyond life expectancy
  27. STASH – all your yarn, also that hidden yarn that your husband isn’t allowed to know about
  28. TALC – Take along crochet
  29. TIA – Thank you in advance, often used in social groups when asking a question.
  30. TOAD – Trashed object abandoned in disgust, never going back to it again.
  31. UFO – Unfinished object, this might become a TOAD at a certain point if you don’t watch out.
  32. USO – Unstarted object, a project you have all the yarn for but have not started yet for which ever reason.
  33. WIP – Work in progress
  34. WIM – Work in mind, your crochet to-do list
  35. WIVSP – Work in very slow progress, can lead to a UFO
  36. YAP – Yet another project
  37. Yarn Barf (also known as Yarn Vomit) – The yarn mess that comes out of the center of a ball of yarn if you don’t get the starting tail right.
  38. Yarn Bomb – An object that has been covered by crochet or knitted fabric. Often public property such as lamp posts, benches and trees.
  39. Yarn Cake – the winded yarn you end up with when winding a skein of yarn using a yarn winder.
  40. YART – Yarn acquisition road trip. Always set yourself a budget before going on these.

Were there terms in there that are new to you? Bet you will never look at a frog in the same way again!

frog

By no means do I claim this list to be complete. If you know terms that should be on this list, please leave a comment and I will add it. I would love to get an overview of as many strange crochet terms as possible. Thank you for helping me with this ❤

With love,

Esther

 

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How to C2C – Corner-to-Corner Crochet

Corner-to-Corner crochet, or C2C for short, is a fun and relaxing technique to work everything from very simple to very intricate designs and graphghans. In my series on Crochet Fundamentals I would like to help you master C2C.

how to c2c corner-to-corner crochet

The basic idea….

The basic idea of C2C is that you start in one corner and work along the diagonal to the other corner; hence the name corner-to-corner. Making squares and rectangles is the easiest, but as such you could also make other shapes by increasing or decreasing the diagonal as needed.

Flow of the method

Below I give you a universal pattern for making a C2C project. The idea is that you start in the bottom-left corner at point O and then work the first pixel. You then turn and come back to work 2 pixels in the opposite direction, turn again and work 3 pixels in the opposite direction again, and so on and so forth. You follow the arrows on the chart working one diagonal after another.

Initially you are increasing your work in two directions, direction A and B. At a certain point A is large enough and then you start decreasing your diagonal in direction D. If you are making a square A = B, which means you decrease the diagonal in both directions, both direction C and D. Otherwise you keep A constant and increase B till B is the correct size, and finally you decease both A and B by working in directions C and D.

Checkerboard C2C

Video help

And after that very mathematical explanation I have you all confused, right? Maybe it is just easier to watch a video in which I show you exactly how to do C2C.

In the video I use a small square design with a two-colored diamond to show you the steps involved in C2C. It is the way I do it, maybe there are others that do the method in a different way, but I have found that this works for me. I show you how to increase and decrease your diagonal as well as how to change color.

C2C design example


General written pattern

If you prefer a written pattern, here I have a general pattern for C2C. This does not specify any color changes nor does it say when to start decreasing. This is to help you see the similarities between any given written C2C instruction and the video.

Abbreviations

Please note that US Crochet Terminology is used for this pattern. If you are more familiar with UK terms, please use this conversion chart as needed.

  • ss – slip stitch
  • s – stitch
  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet
  • RS – right side
  • WS – wrong side
  • pixel – ch3 and 3dc worked into a ch3-space

Increasing the diagonal

In the first part of the pattern increase the diagonal till the width of the main part of the blanket is reached, this means the A is the correct length.

Row 1 (RS)

Ch6 (counts as ch3 and 1dc), 1dc in fourth ch from the hook and in each of the next 2 ch to the end. Turn your work. [1 pixel]

Row 2 (WS)

ch6 (counts as ch3 and 1dc), 1dc in fourth ch from the hook and in each of the next 2 ch to complete a pixel. With the WS of pixel 1 facing and the RS of the pixel of Row 2 just worked facing, line up the top of the dc just worked with the top of the dc’s from Row 1 so that the 2 pixels are touching. ss in the space created by the ch3 at the top of the pixel of Row 1. ch3, 3dc in ch3-space. Turn your work. [2 pixels]

Row 3 (RS)

ch6 (counts as ch3 and 1dc), 1dc in fourth ch from the hook and in each of the next 2 ch to complete a pixel. Rotate the pixel just worked so that you can ss in the ch3-space at the top of the last block worked from Row 2. ch3, 3dc in same ch3-space as the ss. ss in ch3-space at the top of the next pixel, ch3, 3dc in the same ch3-space as the ss. Turn your work. [3 pixels]

Row 4

ch6 (counts as ch3 and 1dc), 1dc in fourth ch from the hook and in each of the next 2 ch to complete a pixel. Rotate the pixel just worked so that you can ss in the ch3-space at the top of the last block worked from the previous row. * ch3, 3dc in same ch3-space as the ss. ss in ch3-space at the top of the next pixel. * Repeat from * to * until you have worked a ss in the ch3-space of the last block of the previous row. ch3, 3dc in the same ch3-space as the ss. Turn your work. [1 pixels more than the previous row]

Rows 5 – α

Repeat Row 4 till the correct width of A is obtained.

Constant diagonal

In this part the diagonal is kept constant. This means that the number of pixels per row is the same for each row. Looking at the checkerboard, this means that A is kept constant and B is increased. If you work a square, i.e. A = B, then skip this part and go to the next stage.

Row (α+1)

Turn your work. ss into the next stitches and into the ch3-space. * ch3, 3dc in same ch3-space as the ss. ss in ch3-space at the top of the next pixel. * Repeat from * to * until you have worked a ss in the ch3-space of the last block of the previous row. ch3, 3dc in the same ch3-space as the ss. Turn your work.

Row (α+2)

ch6 (counts as ch3 and 1dc), 1dc in fourth ch from the hook and in each of the next 2 ch to complete a pixel. Rotate the pixel just worked so that you can ss in the ch3-space at the top of the last block worked from the previous row. * ch3, 3dc in same ch3-space as the ss. ss in ch3-space at the top of the next pixel. * Repeat from * to * until you have worked a ss in the ch3-space of the last block of the previous row. Do not work a pixel on top of the last pixel from the previous row.

Rows (α+3) to β

Repeat Rows (α+1) and (α+2) till B is the correct length.

Decreasing the diagonal

In this part of the pattern the diagonal is decreased to form a square, if A = B, or a rectangle. You are now working in both direction C and D.

Row (β+1)

Turn your work. ss into the next stitches and into the ch3-space. * ch3, 3dc in same ch3-space as the ss. ss in ch3-space at the top of the next pixel. * Repeat from * to * until you have worked a ss in the ch3-space of the last block of the previous row. Turn your work without working on top of the last pixel. [1 pixels less than the previous row]

Rows (β+1) … end

Repeat Row (β+1) till you have filled out the square or rectangle.

 


I hope this tutorial has helped you see the logic behind C2C; it a very mathematical and rhythmic method. I first did C2C for Last Dance on the Beach CAL in which I worked stripes by changing color at the end of a diagonal. Seriously, the sky is the limit here. I would love to see what you have made using C2C. Feel free to share on my Facebook page.

 

With love,

Esther

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How to crochet: slip, chain and single crochet stitches

In this lesson on ‘How to Crochet’ I show you how to make slip stitches, single crochet stitches and chain stitches. All three these stitches have the same name in US and UK terms, so that makes life a little easier this time. In three videos I show you step-by-step how to make these stitches.

slip chain and single crochet stitches

How to make chain stitches

The very first stitch to learn is the chain stitch, always abbreviated as ch. This stitch is often used as a starting point for other stitches to build on. When making chain stitches it’s important to make them all the same size and not pull them too tight. If the stitches are too tight you are going to make life hard for yourself when you have to work in them.  In this video I show you how to make chain stitches.

Often a pattern will say ‘chain xx stiches’ and then you work the next row in those chain stitches. Tip: when you make chain stitches as a base for your work, work the base chain with a hook size larger than the rest of your project. That way you prevent working the chains too tight which in turn could cause your work to pull at the bottom edge. Especially in the beginning when you are still learning to keep your tension even throughout your work it can be hard to keep your base chain at the right tension.


How to make single crochet stitches

Single crochet stitches, abbreviated with sc, are one of the smaller crochet stitches and used in a zillion ways to build a gazillion projects. Again a short video to show you step-by-step how to make single crochet stitches.


How to make slip stitches

Slip stitches are usually used to close a row or connect two parts of a project. It’s a really small stitch and that is why I use a different color yarn in the video because otherwise it can be hard to see. With slip stitches it’s important that you don’t pull your yarn too tight, especially when working many slip stitches in a row, for example as a decorative edge. The reason is that slip stitches have very little room to expand in comparison to other stitches.


Lesson 4

You have now learned a few first stitches, next time I show you how to increase and decrease your stitches. And when you know how to do that we can make a first project, “at last” you must be thinking!

See you next time,

Esther

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